Banded coral shrimp (stenopus hispidus)

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Banded coral shrimp (stenopus hispidus)

Post  liquidg on 26th March 2010, 12:47 pm

Shrimp male and female id before facts on this popular shrimp.

These close ups willl show what the differences are betwen male and female.

Male top veiw shows no colour inside carapace.

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Female top veiw shows colour inside carapace.

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Male veiw from beneath.

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Female veiw from beneath.

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Unferilized female at shed and if no male is present they will stay the same more or les untill their next shed.

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Male straight after a new shed.

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Stages of eggs from overies to tail.

Female just after shell shed and fertilized.

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Female mid way through cycle of egg developement with in it's carapace.

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Female about to pass eggs onto tail hairs.

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Female with eggs under tail.

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Egg abundant tail on one at 5 days.

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There are many theories and fallacies about these inverts and how they find a partner or how long they have a partner for, plus how you can achieve partnering in an aquarium, hopefully these facts will allay some interesting theories people have on these inverts.

Firstly they partner for life unless they loose that partner and than they will take on any other male at any stage of life.

In an aquarium to get them to partner up can be achieved easily but to be careful you should do this by placing the opposite sex to the one you have as the lights go out after a good feeding was provided to the one in your aquarium at the time for complete success.

If you have a small aquarium and you do not have the time to do it this way than take off the nippers of both shrimp to stop them from hurting each other though normally they will not if the one in the aquarium is already at ease with feeding and conditions.

To take off the nippers just hold the body and pull and twist one at a time until they come off and place the shrimp back in the water, you are not injuring them as this a natural ability for life protection and partner protection like a lizard loosing a tail, it grows back.

At the next shed depending on how long it has been from their last shed will dictate how much size they can attain with the new nippers or legs or what ever parts that they have lost from their body.

The only parts that cannot be replaced are complete eyes and actual body sections, basicly any part that has a joint can be replaced at the next shed.

If the shrimp has lost a limb not long after the last shed a near on full size one will be made beneath itís shell at the spot where it normally is on the creature ready to unfold like a rolled up neck tie when it opens up its shell between its back and tail where it joins the body, this is where the new complete shrimp comes out.

If it lost the limb not long after the last shed it will end up with complete but most likely undersized nippers or legs.
The next shed will fix this nicely unless another a fight, lack of adequate foods or an accident occurs.
Some times you find a shrimp with huge nippers; this one has had at least three sheds with no nipper losses.

When a shrimp is about to shed a shell it produces a mucus layer between the new body with in that one that has been jammed with food to swells with the aid of fluids as well when it comes out of the old outer layer, this mucus has a hormone content of two variations, one for the females and another for males.

The females have a signature chemical within there excretion circulated by the currents once released that signals near by males (which will fight for her) that a female some where near by is ready to be fertilized.

This has to be done quickly before the shell starts to harden in just an hour or so and that process is at an end with in 12 to 24 hours from the shed.

With in both sexes excretions are chemicals that predators are aware of as well and will track them down to eat them the same way the male finds her if she has no partner.

These chemicals help each shrimp find each other over a greater distance than they would normally like to travel with out a good reason.
On many occasions you will find a single female shrimp that has had her partner try to defend his female that he has just fertilised that the signature chemicals have now attracted a predator and took his life protecting her.

Another thing that will leave a female alone is that if the male sheds while she has eggs or juveniles still attached she will not defend him and she is left alone from this as well.

Conditions that kill banded shrimp.

If they are placed into greater water temps that they were in of 3 degrees suddenly, than they will normally be dead before hitting the bottom of the aquarium.

The same applies to salinity changes in the same ways at the same measurements.

Micro bubbles may suffocate them to death either by being added to a new tank or over time.

A lot of treatments for white spot or other pests may kill the banded shrimp as white spot and all parasites are also inverts.

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